Emigrants. Irish. History.

Emigrants. Irish. History.
The economic and intellectual conditions that prevail in his own country do not allow the development of individuality.
No man who has at least a drop of his own dignity does not remain in Ireland, but flees from a country that seems to have passed Job’s tests.
From Irish history.
432 AD – Christian missionary St. Patrick (the patron of Ireland) turns the local population into Christianity.
795 AD – Vikings began to raid Ireland, in 841, founded Dublin, and in 1014 in the Battle of Clontarf were defeated.
The flag of the Republic of Ireland consists of rectangles of green, white and orange.
orange color – Orange (Protestant) tradition.
white color – peace, or rather, truce, between them.
See in the east a silv’ry glow,
Out yonder waits the Saxon foe,
So chant a soldier’s song.
Look, in the east there is a silver glow.
There is waiting for the Saxon enemy.
So sing a soldier’s song!
Eight centuries were a succession of conquests, assimilation of conquerors and unsuccessful uprisings.
1916 – The Easter uprising for the independence of Ireland was suppressed by the British, but the courageous resistance and then the speedy execution of the leaders of the uprising contributed to the fact that they and their followers were considered martyrs and attracted the sympathy of a significant part of society.
1919-1921. – Creation of the Irish Republican Army. War for independence.
1921 – according to the Anglo-Irish treaty, the six Ulster provinces remained part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
2005 – the leadership of the Irish Republican Army issued a formal order to end the armed struggle, surrender of weapons and the transition to a political solution to the conflict.
Irish immigrants.
Immigrant Protestants – Scotch-Irish.
When James I ascended the English throne in 1603, one of his tasks was to find a council for the rebellious Irish, most of whom were Catholics. Then the colonization of Ulster began by the English Presbyterian Scots. On the lands belonging to the expelled Irish erlam, the colonists built cities and villages and rooted the Protestant church in a Catholic country.
The Ulster Scots lived here for almost a century. But the English landlords found them similar to the Irish and did not trust them. This, like other religious and economic reasons, led to the mass emigration of the Scots to the Scots in the first half of the XVIII century.
They settled first in New England, surrounded by English colonists, who considered them to be ruffians who drank too much and fought. Later Scottish-Irish immigrants began to go to Pennsylvania, where their neighbors became Germans, who also experienced frequent conflicts. The last place to settle the first wave of Irish immigrants was Appalachian.
The Irish Protestants were the first to encounter such a strong rejection by early settlers. But the hardest part was the Irish, who were Catholics.
Immigrants are Catholics.
They were the first large ethnic group in America, whose culture was very different from the dominant Protestant / Anglo-Saxon – Catholics, the bearers of anti-British sentiment and, in addition, the villagers.
Irish people were forerunners of future “new” immigrants (Chinese, Poles, Italians), representatives of very different cultures, arriving in large numbers, living in harsh conditions and admitted only to low-skilled jobs, faced with unprecedented discrimination, but managed to defend their place in the sun America.
Discrimination.
The Chicago Post wrote: “The Irish have flooded our prisons and doss houses, scrape a prisoner or a beggar, and you will find an Irish Catholic.” If we put them on boats and send them home, we will destroy the crime in the country. ”
Irish stereotyped as alcoholics, rowdy, criminals, and having reached any power – as solid bribe takers.
Their response was defensive-aggressive. Instead of resigning to the existing order of things, they united and began to defend themselves. The insult was answered by violence. Solidarity was their strength. They prayed and drank together, although more often the second one happened. Their church was belligerent – a church that fought not only for souls, but also for human rights.
“No Irish Need Apply” days are over. The parade on St. Patrick’s Day replaced confrontation. The Irish not only achieved recognition of their holiday, but also made everyone feel like an Irishman on this day. Amerkanization in Irish took place.
When an Irishman is outside Ireland, he often becomes a respected person.
The economic and intellectual conditions that prevail in his own country do not allow the development of individuality.
No man who has at least a drop of his own dignity does not remain in Ireland, but flees from a country that seems to have passed Job’s tests.


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