Immigration to Canada new rules

Immigration to Canada new rules h1>
“Changes in Canada’s Immigration Law & quot;
Changes to the selection criteria for the economic class immigrants.
Independent and Assisted Relative Immigrants who applied before December 17, 2001 and until January 1, 2003.
Independent and Assisted Relative Immigrants who applied before December 17, 2001 and who have not received a selection decision prior to January 1, 2003 will be subject to the proposed selection criteria and a proposed pass mark of 70 points (reduced from 75).
Independent and Assisted Relative Immigrants who apply on or after December 17, 2001 and will have been determined. The proposed pass mark in the pre-published regulations is 80 points.
Factor 1: Age (maximum 10 points)
Factor 2: Education (maximum 25 points)
You have not completed secondary school (also called high school).
You have completed a secondary school at least 12 years of full-time or full-time equivalent studies.
You have completed a one-year program at least 13 years of full-time or full-time equivalent studies.
You have completed a two-year post-secondary program and at least 14 years of full-time or full-time equivalent studies.
You have completed a three-year post-secondary program and at least 15 years of full-time or full-time equivalent studies.
You have completed a three-year university program and at least 15 years of full-time or full-time equivalent studies.
You have completed a Master’s or Ph.D. at least 17 years of full-time equivalent.
Factor 3: English and French language ability (maximum 20 points)
To assess your English and French ability, first decide which language you are most comfortable with. This language is your first official language. The language you feel is less comfortable communicating in is your second official language. Next, award points according to your ability to read, write, listen to and speak English and French. Use the following definitions:
You can communicate effectively in the most community and workplace situations. You speak, listen, read and write the language very well.
You can make yourself understood and understood. You speak, listen, read and write the language well.
Basic or no proficiency.
You do not meet the above criteria for moderate proficiency.
Calculating your language points.
Basic or no proficiency.
Basic or no proficiency.
Add your credits: Total of read + write + listen + speak = ______ (total points)
Factor 4: Work experience (maximum 25 points)
To calculate your points, you must first find your work experience on the National Occupational Classification (NOC), which can be found at http://www.hrdc-drhc.gc.ca/noc. You must have at least one year’s full-time or full-time equivalent work experience in an occupation listed in the Training Type O (management occupations) or Skill Levels A or B in the past 10 years to score points for this factor. Skill Level A consists of professional occupations while the Skill Level is comprised of technical, skilled trades and paraprofessional occupations. Eligible work experience may be in more than one occupation.
Once you reach the NOC Web site, scroll down the page and click on the “NOC Search Engine” link. Next, type the occupation in which you have experience into the “New Search” field. Your occupation will appear in the “Results” box, along with a four-digit number. If the first digit is 0, you have experience in the Skill Type O. If you have experience in more than one occupation, you may repeat the search for each occupation.
Once you have determined that you have the required work experience, you can estimate your points. Give yourself 10 points for one year’s experience and five points for each additional year to a maximum of 25 points.
If your work experience has not been in the past 10 years, your application will be refused.
Factor 5: Arranged employment (maximum 10 points)
Give yourself 10 points if you have a job that has been approved by Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC). You must be qualified for, capable of, and willing to do. You must also meet any required licensing or regulatory standards associated with the job.
HRDC yourself; your potential employer. HRC, you may be able to earn points for it under Factor 6 (Adaptability).
If you have been working in Canada for at least one year, you have also been eligible for 10 points.
Factor 6: Adaptability (maximum 10 points)
You can receive a maximum of 10 points based on any combination of the elements listed below:
Your accompanying spouse or common-law partner’s level of education.
Secondary school (high school) diploma or less.
Completed a one-year or two-year program.
Completed a three-year post secondary program and has at least 15 years of education.
Completed a three-year university degree and has at least 15 years of education.
Completed a Master’s or Ph.D. and has at least 17 years of education.
You or your accompanying spouse or common-law partner has studied in Canada.
No, or less than two years post-secondary education in Canada.
Completed a post-secondary program in at least two years in Canada since the age of 17.
You or your accompanying spouse or common-law partner has worked in Canada.
No, or less than one year full-time work in Canada.
Worked full-time in Canada for at least one year.
You or your accompanying spouse or common-law partner has a family in Canada.
Have a parent, grandparent, aunt, uncle, sister, brother, nephew, niece, child or grandchild who is a Canadian citizen or permanent resident living in Canada.
You have a job offer in Canada.
Have a genuine job offer.
Use this worksheet to calculate your total point score. If you applied before December 17, 2001, the proposed pass mark is 70 (reduced from 75). If you applied on December 17, 2001 or after, the proposed pass mark in the pre-published regulations is 80. If there is a difference between the points you give yourself, the visa officer’s assessment will prevail .


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